Kent Narrows Bridge

St. Michaels Through Kent Narrows

Heading to Kent Narrows
Heading to Kent Narrows

The morning at Swan Creek started like most others, except for one small thing.  The night before the women decided to abandon their ships and all come aboard the Hun Bun with Christa.  Frank was thrown overboard and luckily Billy picked him up in the Bonnie Christine.  Birgitta, Dunc, Linda and Christa set off for St. Michaels as other women with their men watched as we yelled ‘ladies day’ and knew they were jealous as they yelled back at us cheering.  The first of many laughs was on the men we left behind — no galley wenches made their breakfasts this morning and no sandwiches were left for their lunch.

Linda read us a small story (one eyes, two eyes and three eyes) as we attempted to sail, but ended up power/sailing due to wind direction and speed.  She also brought some delicious homemade carrot soup we all had for lunch.  Playing Creedence Clearwater we sang along, navigated by gps and chart and anticipated our calling for a bridge opening to go through Kent Narrows.  Captain and crew were inspiring.  A fisherman was passing and hooting at us and wanted to come aboard.  But we forged on with our destination in mind.  After passing through Kent Narrows and continuing on we didn’t notice that Billy and Frank had passed through before us and were tied up along side a restaurant having an afternoon cocktail and sandwich…funny thing though, we took photos as we passed and later saw their boat (they did fess up so we weren’t able to to tell them how we knew). After Linda did a superb job on anchor, we sat and waited for the men in the other two boats to come along and anchor beside us.

That evening it wouldn’t have been the same if we didn’t go crab banging again at the Crab Claw Restaurant.  Billy got crabs from a woman there that night (her leftovers in exchange for a beer).  P9300202

So much to offer.  The next day started with a walk with Linda in the morning through town.  There was a farmer’s market where we bought some fresh vegetables – ran into BIlly and he took them back to the boat for us.  Two separate religious groups raising religious awareness sang songs of god in harmonizing melody.  Made me sad.  As we continued along Talbot Street we came upon a brew pub.  Although it was only 11:30 AM — a flight of five various beers and a bowl of popcorn became lunch.  The ‘Duck Duck Goose’ which had a hint of coffee and chocolate was a heavier, but delicious beer.  Had a great time talking with the bartender and other visitors who stopped in.  Later in the day we went to the Maritime Museum which was holding a small boat show of mostly hand-made boats.  The various designs and precision workmanship was something to admire.   I liken St. Michaels to Cape May, as Cape May had been one of my favorite stops (still is) but St. Michaels rivals for top billing with all their town has to offer the transient boater and vacationer seeking the charm of a nautical community. DSC_0935

Staten Island Ferry

Cruising into New York City

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Seeing the Statute of Liberty off in the distance made me wonder how the immigrants  must have felt.  I know how I feel so I can’t imagine the emotion that stirred within them.  A symbol of freedom.   I appreciate being a citizen of the United States.

We came into New York up the River on a Sunday.  The ferry and boat traffic was incredible and the throngs of people everywhere one looked was mind boggling.  Heavy security was prevalent.  Coast Guard boats with automatic weapons came alongside our boats.  Helicopters hovered by the United Nations.

and the Pursuit of Happiness
and the Pursuit of Happiness

The trip today invoked an array of feelings and emotions.  The exhilaration I felt as we passed under Throggs Neck Bridge and headed down the East River to the City lifted my spirits high.  Going down through the infamous Hell Gate and up the East River we passed the prison on Riker’s Island and it made me reflect upon  all the bad people in there and why were they so bad.  Planes flew out of the ground into the air at LaGuardia.  Children played basketball and soccer along the shore while families enjoyed picnics.  There were ruins and traffic and the noise going under the bridges from the cars and trucks overhead was like thunder up close.

New York City
New York City

The construction of the new tower where the twin towers once stood was impressive to say the least.  Billy, Linda and I went into the city up the Hudson where we imagined Sully landing “we’re going down in the Hudson” and what it must have been like for those people standing on the wing knowing they were alive.  We  circumnavigated the site of the 9/11 attack and talked about what it would have been like and couldn’t fathom what the people went through.  Tickets to actually get in weren’t available but the city adventure was well worth the $3 per foot to dock the boat for a couple hours.  The memorials are heartbreaking.  The air feels thick.  There is security and police everywhere.  The construction of the new building made me ponder the resilience and perseverance of the New York people.  Ladder Co. 10 adjacent to the site and the firefighter memorial made you stop, stare and be there almost trance like without realization.  Trying to mail some post cards there were no street side boxes.  Sitting for a sandwich, when I asked a couple people if they could drop my postcards in the mail at their office, they were hesitant and not trusting of me.  The third person I asked was a couple women sitting beside us.  They took the post cards, with hesitation.  Come to find out one of them was in town from Marshfield, the town right beside Scituate.  Today was a day that exhausted you from being happy, exhuberant, exhilarated to saddened, contemplative and appreciative of what you have.  A big high to a big low — but bringing yourself back up in true admiration of these people we call New Yorkers.